Why Everyone Needs To Watch Kita Kita

 

We see you

 

Some people say that the Philippine film industry – at least the drama/romance segment – is getting old and dry. It’s the same equation with different actors in slightly different situations. They produce the same results with the same love teams that sport different hairstyles.

 

To those naysayers, we raise you Kita Kita.

 

 

It’s literal, but refreshing

We’ve heard the saying and maybe even experienced it ourselves: Love is blind. Kita Kita quite literally plays on this notion, but in a way that serves as a breath of fresh air because it isn’t at all what you would expect.

 

It isn’t a story about social classes or third parties or a bad-boy-turned-good-for-the-girl-he-loves. It’s a simple story about falling in love over ramen noodles and playing pretend.

 

It’s funny when it needs to be, but you still feel everything

The film stars Empoy Marquez and Alessandra De Rossi so you know there are going to be well-placed comedic parts. But unlike films that try too hard to inject comedy into the script, Kita Kita is only funny when it needs to be. It’s in those moments that Empoy’s Tonyo cracks jokes to make Alessandra’s Lea laugh. It’s in the times when Tonyo speaks in broken and barok English and takes advantage of Lea’s blindness. In this way, audiences are still left with enough time to feel what the movie wants you to feel. And it will make you feel a lot.

 

It has everything from betrayal and loss to love and hope. It has all the makings of a real love story told in picturesque Sapporo, Japan. You’ll awe at the rivers and gardens, but your eyes will be glued to the actors and your ears will catch every word they say (but the subtitles will save you when you’re laughing too loudly). You’ll know nothing but their journey for the duration of the film and you won’t want for anything else.

 

 

The lessons are so on point

At a time where people are obsessed with looking perfect (don’t deny looking for that filter that highlights your face just so), Kita Kita is exactly what we need. The lesson is glaringly obvious, but the story isn’t at all forced. And yes, we admit, that the plot itself isn’t exactly novel – but the film definitely is.

 

 

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